Help now!
16 May

‘One Happy Family: a home for the people who need it’

Sam Salih

Sam Salih fled his country from war five years ago. He stayed for two months in Greece, travelled to Italy and eventually was able to get to Germany. Now he finally is in safety, he decided to commit his life to helping others who are stuck in Greece. This is his fourth time to volunteer at One Happy Family.

‘More than 9000 refugees are stuck on Lesvos. I know their suffering. It would be easier for me to forget what I've been through. But I don’t want to banish my past from my thoughts. It gives me the power to help others that are in the same situation I was.’

I decided to come to Lesvos, because …
‘Life is not fair. A lot of people don’t care about the people who are in need. The ones who suffer don’t have any power or rights. They need people to fight for them.

You get further in life, because other people decide to help you. The same goes for me. I have a stable life now. And I own it to the people who chose to lend me a helping hand.’

I keep coming back, because …
‘I was not born to just live for myself. I could use my free time to have fun. But I already have everything that makes me happy. I have a job, I have an apartment and I earn enough money. My life is stable. Why shouldn’t I try to accomplish the same for others? When I’m older, and I won’t be able to volunteer anymore, I will be happy that I’ve used my time helping others.’

One Happy Family is …
‘A home for the people who need it. This organization provides a daily program for more than five hundred people everyday. People can enjoy their time and use the qualities they have. This is good, because it means they are busy with something positive.

The visitors can go to school, get a haircut or talk with their friends while they are enjoying a cup of tea. The support they get here gives them hope. What is going on in this island is horrible. For this, life in One Happy Family is not the reality. But it is a reality that can make the people stable for now.’

You always have small goals and big dreams in life. Refugees are able to achieve their small goals here, while they are waiting for their big dream to come true. Which is to go of this island and be free.’

My message to refugees…
Visit one One Happy Family. This place gives you the opportunity to use your qualities or to practice your hobbies. It keeps you busy. It will free your mind for a while. When I arrived in Germany, I did not know anyone. A football club then welcomed me in their team. I went there several times a week and it made me forget about my problems. One Happy Family works exactly like this. They support you and keep you positive. It is a big family who’s door is open for everyone.

Age: 30

Country: Germany

Occupation: security

Stay: 1 March - 1 April

10 May

‘Sometimes a Mandala can save a life’

Dilan Siper

I came to Lesvos, because …
‘A feeling of powerlessness overwhelmed me. I am active in a left-wing student group, but because of my study I didn’t have a lot of time to focus on it. Added to this, political work is very frustrating. You put so much effort in it, but you barely see any results. I was at a point that I wanted to work somewhere where I could see the effects of the work I do. I contacted a German organization and they connected me to One Happy Family.’

My tasks in One Happy Family were …
‘Working at the boutique, giving out drachma’s at the bank and organizing the art table and other activities. The visitors really need to be occupied. Especially the art table was surprisingly succesful. Many adults - which were also men -  enjoyed it.

I learned here that, when you are in so much pain, a simple Mandala can bring you so much. The visitors might not like to draw one if they had a normal, stable life. But in this situation they are looking for distraction. They want to be focussed on something else, rather than thinking about the situation they are in. I never realized as much as here, that the little things are the most important. Sometimes a Mandela can safe a life.

My experience in the community center was …
‘Intense.This community center is a happy bubble. At the beginning this felt wrong, because it is not the reality. I sometimes asked myself what I was doing here. I wasn’t changing anything about the situation. But I came back from this. I realized that these people need a place to forget the reality. And if that is just for six hours, than thats’ ok. Changing the little moments, are as important as changing the big situation.

All of my friends have asked me about my experience here. It is hard to answer their question, because it’s a feeling and not something rational. I knew about the situation before I came here. But it feels different now. It is like reading the newspaper. You know what has happened to someone, but you don’t know the person.  Now I know these people, with their personality and the look in their eyes. They are human beings now. Not just names.’

This struck me the most …
All of the stories I heard were horrible. But what struck me the most, was when someone was thinking about their future. The past is also hard, but it has ended. Their future still has to come and it is already terrible. You can’t tell them everything will be fine, because you don’t know this. Everything is uncertain and that is awful.

What I would like to tell to other people …
I would like to tell  people that they should try to do something about the refugee crises in their own country. Because that is were you can make the biggest change. If you have the ability to visit this island, you should. The feeling that this experience gives you is so important. It makes the difference.’

Age: 23

Country: Germany

Occupation: psychology student

Stay: 21 march - 30 april

 

02 May

‘Volunteering in One Happy Family has become an addiction’

Fanny from Switzerland

One Happy Family still had to be built, when Fanny Oppler came here for the first time.This was more than a year ago. In March this year, she visited the center for the third time. ‘When I arrived here one year ago, I did a lot of construction work. I painted the walls and shoveled the ground. The center opened two days after I left. In September I came back to see the result. Volunteering in One Happy Family has become an addiction since then.’

My task at One Happy Family was …
‘To work at the bank. The system they have invented for this is great. The visitors get two ‘drachma’ everyday. They can get several things with this. A cup of tea, a haircut, or clothes at the boutique. They chose however they want to spent the drachma. I like the idea of a basic income. The fact that they are responsible for their expenses is also a good thing. It gives them a feeling of independency again.

The atmosphere at One Happy Family is good. But we do need some extra support when the bank opens. Some people are not willing to stand in line or they argue with you because they need more drachma. This may sound absurd, but imagine how desperate these people are to fight over a ticket. Luckily, this doesn’t happen a lot. The people are managing. They are so strong.’

I keep coming back, because …
‘The persons i've met here are amazing. Especially the people from Moria who work in the community center. They work so hard. It’s them that keeps this place running. One Happy Family is their place. The volunteers just support them.

The team working in the kitchen illustrates how much they love the community center. They are cooking for more than six hundred people in just two pots on the ground. It is amazing. Just like them, many people in this place are so talented. It is such a shame that they are stuck on this island.’

What struck me the most, was …
The system of the asylum seekers. It is so random. Some people from Syria get the blue stamp, while others from this country get rejected. There is just no logic. And they decide over human lives with this randomness. It is awful.’

My wish for refugees is …
‘That the war stops so they can go back to their country. Because that is what most of them want. They don’t want to stay in Europe. I hope the madness of this island will stop soon. And that the situation in Moria will change. So many boats are arriving in Lesvos. I can’t imagine how all these people will live there. It is going to be a war zone. Politicians all over Europe should act. They have to do something about it.’

Fanny Oppler

Age: 27

Country: Switzerland

Occupation: graphic designer

Stay: 1 march - 1 april

01 May

Pressemitteilung: Organisierte Gewalt gegen Geflüchtete auf Lesbos

„Eine Sonntagnacht im Frühling auf Lesbos, die Angst macht. Angst, dass Angriffe auf Menschen, die ihr Grundrecht auf Asyl in Anspruch nehmen, zur Normalität werden könnten.“

Die Situation auf Lesbos und den anderen griechischen Inseln ist seit dem 20. März 2016, mit dem Inkrafttreten des EU-Türkei-Abkommens, eine Ausnahmesituation.
Menschen, die Asyl beantragen wollen, werden in ihrem Grundrecht der Bewegungsfreiheit eingeschränkt. Am 17. April 2018 wurde dies vom höchsten griechischen Verfassungsgericht als verfassungswidrig einstuft.1 Dieser Entscheid wurde kurz darauf von einer anderen Instanz wieder außer Kraft gesetzt, sodass die neu ankommenden Geflüchteten weiterhin keine Möglichkeit haben die Insel zu verlassen.

Aktuell leben über 6’700 Menschen im Hotspot Moria, gebaut für 1’800 Personen. Weitere über 1’200 Menschen, vor allem Familien, leben im zweiten öffentlichen Camp, Kara Tepe. Um die 600 Personen wohnen zudem in anderen Unterkünften, wie zum Beispiel dem nicht offiziellen Camp Pikpa. Im Zeitraum von Januar bis zum 24. April 2018 sind 4’289 Menschen auf der Insel Lesbos angekommen.

Aufgrund dieser unhaltbaren Zustände und dem vermeidbaren Tod eines Mitgliedes der afghanischen Gemeinschaft in der letzten Woche, begonnen die Mitglieder dieser Gruppe am Dienstag, den 17. April einen friedlichen Protest auf Mytilinis Hauptplatz.
Bei der sonntäglichen Militärparade am 22. April kamen lokale Bewohnerinnen und Bewohner aus Mytilini in Solidarität mit zwei vom türkischen Militär inhaftierten griechischen Soldaten zur Prozession. Nach der Parade bewegte sich ein Teil der Gruppe in Richtung der protestierenden Geflüchteten, wo sich ihnen Dutzende weiterer Menschen anschlossen. Die Polizei formte sofort zwei Linien zwischen den Geflüchteten und den Menschen auf der anderen Seite des Platzes.

Was dann passierte ist in unseren Augen eine Schande und deutlich zu verurteilen:
Die, zumeist wohl Mitglieder von einer extrem-rechts orientierten Gruppierung3 und Hooligans,4 fingen an, die friedlich demonstrierenden Asylsuchenden zu attackieren.
Diese formten rasch einen Kreis, um in dessen Mitte Frauen und Kinder mit aufgespannten Decken zu schützen.

Die Attacke zeigte sich folgendermaßen:

  • Es wurden über Stunden hinweg Leuchtfeuer, Flaschen und Steine auf die Geflüchteten geworfen.
  • Flaschen wurden mit Benzin gefüllt, halb verschlossen und in die Menge der Geflüchteten geworfen, gefolgt von Feuerwerkskörpern.
  • Es wurde lauthals „Verbrennt sie lebendig“ gerufen.Große Müllcontainer wurden in Flammen gesetzt und in Richtung der Geflüchteten gestoßen.
  • In halb-verschlossene Flaschen gefülltes Tränengas wurde auf die Geflüchteten und die Mitarbeitenden von internationalen Organisationen geworfen.
  • Menschen, die den Platz verlassen wollten, da sie medizinische Hilfe benötigten, wurden weiterhin attackiert.
  • Afghanische Familien und Kinder verließen den Platz, um sich in Sicherheit zu bringen. Sie mussten sich stundenlang an verschiedenen Orten verstecken, teilweise mit ausgeschaltetem Licht, da die Rechtsradikalen durch die Straßen patrouillierten.

Die Polizei versuchte die Angreifenden auf Distanz zu halten, war dabei jedoch zu zögerlich und ließ zu, dass mehrere Angreifer die vermeintlich schützende Polizeireihe durchbrechen und die friedlichen Demonstranten attackieren konnten. Auch wurden die Angreifer nicht außerhalb der Wurfdistanz zurückgedrängt, wodurch dutzende Geflüchtete kleine bis schwere Verletzungen erlitten. Es schien, als ob sie schlussendlich einen Deal mit den Attackierenden ausgehandelt hatten: Nachdem die Polizei mit den Angreifern sprach, warteten diese ruhig am Ende des Platzes, während die Polizei um ca. 5:30 morgens die Geflüchteten mit Gewalt in einen Bus führte und unter Arrest setzte. Zumindest ein Teil der Attackierenden war organisiert. So heißt es, dass 50 von ihnen aus Athen angereist waren, mit dem Ziel die Geflüchteten anzugreifen. Auch eine Facebook-Gruppe mit dem Namen „Mytilene Patriotic Movement II“ und eine Website riefen zur Unterstützung auf.

Somit kann man von zum Teil organisierter Gewalt gegenüber Geflüchteten ausgehen, welche über die Stunden der Attacken hinweg keine Gegenangriffe zeigten. Selbst als weitere Geflüchtete anderer Gemeinschaften zur Unterstützung kamen, wurden sie vom Leiter des friedlichen Protests darum gebeten keine Gewalt anzuwenden.
Weitere Details von Menschen vor Ort: Chronicles of the night.

Dies ist nicht das erste Mal, dass Gewalt gegenüber Geflüchteten auf der Insel Lesbos ausgeübt wurde. Dennoch ist es das erste Mal, dass mehrere Hundert Menschen über Stunden hinweg Geflüchtete attackierten – all das ohne deutliche Reaktionen oder Maßnahmen von Seiten der Polizei. Die Geflüchteten (120 Personen) sowie zwei Personen einer lokalen Solidaritäts-Gruppe wurden verhaftet und angeklagt. Der Gerichtstermin wurde für den 9. Mai 2019 (!) festgelegt.

Inzwischen wurden 17 der Angreifer von der Polizei identifiziert, 5 von ihnen stammen aus Lesbos und haben mit ernsthaften Konsequenzen zu rechnen. Die Menschen, die auf Lesbos festsitzen und diese Nacht erleben mussten, bedanken sich bei Ihnen für Ihre Berichterstattung.

Im Namen des Teams
Henrike Bittermann und Fabian Bracher

Pressemitteilung als PDF

Bild: Ekathimerini

18 Nov

Die Bank von Moria

“Good morning my friend.” My friend, das sind die ersten Wörter, die man auf Englisch lernt, wenn man in Moria lebt. So wie Mina, die Afghanin, die jeden Morgen an meinem Bankschalter steht. Also, Bankschalter ist übertrieben. Es ist ein halb kaputter Laptop aus dem Jahr 2001 und eine Metallkiste mit Spielgeld-Drachmen drin. Bloß, dass das Spielgeld tatsächlich etwas wert ist: Ein Tschai eine Drachme, ein Pulli zwei Drachmen. Mina bekommt zwei Drachmen von mir, wie jeden Tag, so lange sie ein Flüchtling in dem Lager auf Lesbos ist, dessen Name so klingt wie das böse Reich eines Tolkien-Romans: Moria. So ähnlich stelle ich es mir dort auch vor, nur ohne das rote Auge und die Orks. Dafür mit willkürlichen Militärs. “I’m sorry, I don’t have my Ausweis with me”, sagt Mina – Ausweis, das erste Wort, das man auf Deutsch lernt, wenn man ihn braucht, um Drachmen zu bekommen. “Ach, Mina, no Ausweis, no Drachma”, sage ich scherzhaft. Nach zwei Wochen kenne ich sie inzwischen, sie weiß ihre Ausweisnummer auswendig, ich habe ihn schon zehn Mal gesehen. Sie grinst und fragt mich, wo ich eigentlich herkomme. Aus Deutschland? “Ah, Angela Merkel, she’s very good.” Angela Merkel, die erste europäische Politikerin, die man kennt, wenn man auf Asyl hofft. Ich habe es aufgegeben zu erklären, dass sie eigentlich eher konservativ ist und eine Obergrenze einführt, die sie nicht so nennt, und dass eine linke Regierung vielleicht mehr täte. Es glaubt mir eh keiner.
Heute ist mein letzter Tag hier. “One Happy Family” heißt das allein auf Privatspenden basierende Community Center, das den Flüchtlingen von Moria ein bisschen Menschenwürde zurückgibt. “One Tired Family”, sagt Shaheer, einer der Freiwilligen aus den Reihen der Flüchtlinge, er ist 21 und wartet seit einem Jahr auf den blauen Stempel, um die Insel verlassen zu dürfen. “Ey Malaka, machst du noch die Bank?”, ruft er mir zu, als ich Mina ihre Drachmen gegeben habe. Malaka, das erste griechische Wort das man lernt, wenn man in einem militärgeführten Lager lebt. Wer es bei One Happy Family sagt, meint das Gegenteil.
“Nee, ich bin fertig”, antworte ich und schließe die Bank, also den Laptop, dessen System ohnehin schon seit fünf Minuten geschlossen hat. Oder seit 2001, genaugenommen. “Gut”, antwortet Shaheer und hilft mir, die Bank ins Büro zu tragen. “Dann kannst du mir ja jetzt mal das mit der AfD erklären. Warum mögen die uns nicht?” “Puuh”, stoße ich ratlos aus und überlege, ob es eine Antwort gibt. Also eine, die ich ihm geben kann. Oder überhaupt irgendeine sinnvolle. “Weil sie dich noch nicht kennen, Shaheer”, antworte ich schließlich. Er lacht sein halbironisches Lachen, er ist klug und weiß, dass es keine guten Antworten gibt. Es ist mein letzter Tag und ruhig heute, wir haben Zeit für Unterhaltungen und Tschai und ein bisschen Hoffnung.
“Pass auf dich auf, Malaka”, sagt er zum Abschied, obwohl er das nötiger hat als ich. Am Ende des Tages werde ich in einer luxuriös ausgestatteten Fähre nach Athen sitzen, und er wird zurück in das 20-Quadratmeter-Appartment gehen, wo er mit vier Freunden auf dem Boden schläft, weil das besser ist als Moria. “Du auch, Malaka”, antworte ich. Aber eigentlich meine ich: “Wir sehen uns in Deutschland, Habibi.” Habibi, das erste Wort auf Arabisch, das man lernt, wenn man Teil der Familie wird.

Artikel von Jesko, er war im Herbst 2017 Volontär im OHF.

Publiziert im Blitz-Stadtmagazin: https://blitz-world.de/halle/hal-kol.htm

Mehr Blogeinträge von Jesko über Europa, Lesbos und das OHF unter http://blog.derjesko.de oder auf Facebook unter https://www.facebook.com/derjesko

18 Nov

Die Bank von Moria

“Good morning my friend.” My friend, das sind die ersten Wörter, die man auf Englisch lernt, wenn man in Moria lebt. So wie Mina, die Afghanin, die jeden Morgen an meinem Bankschalter steht. Also, Bankschalter ist übertrieben. Es ist ein halb kaputter Laptop aus dem Jahr 2001 und eine Metallkiste mit Spielgeld-Drachmen drin. Bloß, dass das Spielgeld tatsächlich etwas wert ist: Ein Tschai eine Drachme, ein Pulli zwei Drachmen. Mina bekommt zwei Drachmen von mir, wie jeden Tag, so lange sie ein Flüchtling in dem Lager auf Lesbos ist, dessen Name so klingt wie das böse Reich eines Tolkien-Romans: Moria. So ähnlich stelle ich es mir dort auch vor, nur ohne das rote Auge und die Orks. Dafür mit willkürlichen Militärs. “I’m sorry, I don’t have my Ausweis with me”, sagt Mina – Ausweis, das erste Wort, das man auf Deutsch lernt, wenn man ihn braucht, um Drachmen zu bekommen. “Ach, Mina, no Ausweis, no Drachma”, sage ich scherzhaft. Nach zwei Wochen kenne ich sie inzwischen, sie weiß ihre Ausweisnummer auswendig, ich habe ihn schon zehn Mal gesehen. Sie grinst und fragt mich, wo ich eigentlich herkomme. Aus Deutschland? “Ah, Angela Merkel, she’s very good.” Angela Merkel, die erste europäische Politikerin, die man kennt, wenn man auf Asyl hofft. Ich habe es aufgegeben zu erklären, dass sie eigentlich eher konservativ ist und eine Obergrenze einführt, die sie nicht so nennt, und dass eine linke Regierung vielleicht mehr täte. Es glaubt mir eh keiner.
Heute ist mein letzter Tag hier. “One Happy Family” heißt das allein auf Privatspenden basierende Community Center, das den Flüchtlingen von Moria ein bisschen Menschenwürde zurückgibt. “One Tired Family”, sagt Shaheer, einer der Freiwilligen aus den Reihen der Flüchtlinge, er ist 21 und wartet seit einem Jahr auf den blauen Stempel, um die Insel verlassen zu dürfen. “Ey Malaka, machst du noch die Bank?”, ruft er mir zu, als ich Mina ihre Drachmen gegeben habe. Malaka, das erste griechische Wort das man lernt, wenn man in einem militärgeführten Lager lebt. Wer es bei One Happy Family sagt, meint das Gegenteil.
“Nee, ich bin fertig”, antworte ich und schließe die Bank, also den Laptop, dessen System ohnehin schon seit fünf Minuten geschlossen hat. Oder seit 2001, genaugenommen. “Gut”, antwortet Shaheer und hilft mir, die Bank ins Büro zu tragen. “Dann kannst du mir ja jetzt mal das mit der AfD erklären. Warum mögen die uns nicht?” “Puuh”, stoße ich ratlos aus und überlege, ob es eine Antwort gibt. Also eine, die ich ihm geben kann. Oder überhaupt irgendeine sinnvolle. “Weil sie dich noch nicht kennen, Shaheer”, antworte ich schließlich. Er lacht sein halbironisches Lachen, er ist klug und weiß, dass es keine guten Antworten gibt. Es ist mein letzter Tag und ruhig heute, wir haben Zeit für Unterhaltungen und Tschai und ein bisschen Hoffnung.
“Pass auf dich auf, Malaka”, sagt er zum Abschied, obwohl er das nötiger hat als ich. Am Ende des Tages werde ich in einer luxuriös ausgestatteten Fähre nach Athen sitzen, und er wird zurück in das 20-Quadratmeter-Appartment gehen, wo er mit vier Freunden auf dem Boden schläft, weil das besser ist als Moria. “Du auch, Malaka”, antworte ich. Aber eigentlich meine ich: “Wir sehen uns in Deutschland, Habibi.” Habibi, das erste Wort auf Arabisch, das man lernt, wenn man Teil der Familie wird.

Artikel von Jesko, er war im Herbst 2017 Volontär im OHF.

Publiziert im Blitz-Stadtmagazin: https://blitz-world.de/halle/hal-kol.htm

Mehr Blogeinträge von Jesko über Europa, Lesbos und das OHF unter http://blog.derjesko.de oder auf Facebook unter https://www.facebook.com/derjesko

01 Aug

A unique and a safe haven for a lot of people

Thoughts of Jael To and Noemi Fricker, two of our One Happy Family Volunteers, after working with One Happy Family for a couple of days.

The media seems to have forgotten about the reality that thousands are still fleeing war zones… People are still coming almost daily to Lesvos and other Greek Islands with inflatable boats – searching for a safe place to live in peace… There are still smaller, private funded NGOs and grassroots organizations helping these newly arrived people at the beach. People are still deported to Turkey and still, we get informations about illegal pushbacks by the coastguard – even if everyone is aware of the bad conditions for refugees in Turkey.

After arriving on the island, people have to live for the first month in Moria Refugee Camp. Families may be granted to live somewhere else, while many single men and women are stuck. Moria Camp, a former prison built for 500 criminals, then extended for up to 2’000 people, now holds about 3’200 people fleeing from terrible conditions in their home countries. Children are seeking a place to stay, a place to learn, a place to laugh. Women are risking everything for a better future for their children, wanting to be able to provide their children a safe place to grow up and themselves a place to live in peace. Men try to forget about the suffering back home. All are seeking a life where human rights are respected.

“If I don’t witness it, if I don’t try to see the whole picture, if I don’t build an opinion, if I don’t act when things go totally wrong – I would be ashamed of myself.”

These people demand to be known. They demand that we share our knowledge about their situation. They demand to be treated in a way that one would treat their family and friends. The One Happy Family – Community Center provides a safe place where beneficiaries can spend their time and get back some self determination. This Community Center is so special since it’s not made and run for the refugees but it works together with them. It provides a room to be just a human being and not primarily a refugee. It provides a safe place where everyone can develop his or her own ideas, where you can sit quietly and have a coffee if you wish for it and where people from all kind of backgrounds gather together.

It is unique and a safe haven for a lot of people, but this project needs your support:

Donate, if you think that these people fleeing from war deserve to have a safe space outside of the camps and get their basic needs such as clothes, food, and a strong community.

14 Jul

Happy people do good things

„Happy people do good things“ – as simple as it is, that’s what I’ve learned at the OHF. And it is a challenge to spread happiness in a context where crimes against humanity caused by the European closed-doors policy become the most visible. Deportations, inhuman conditions in the camps, a lack of perspective – all these EU-constructions are not what people should be confronted with after having experienced war and violence. The more important it gets to have a kind of „safe haven“ while being stuck and forced to wait, an open space to come together, meet friends, laugh and relax. And the OHF shows how it works: solidarity, diversity and tolerance in practice, not for but with each other, at eye-level.

The OHF is a role-model for what large parts of the European affluent society should put into practice urgently, by opening a space where human values are upheld and that allows expression as well as potential and resources to unfold – as far as possible in the context of a humanitarian crisis. You rock!

Johanna

14 Jul

Es läuft – aber nicht ohne unsere Helfer

Eindrücke nach 9 Wochen als Volunteer Koordinatorin

Von meinem ersten Aufenthalt im Frühjahr 2016 wusste ich wie intensiv schon ein kurzer Einsatz vor Ort sein konnte. Anderes Land, viele neue Menschen aus verschiedensten Kulturen, mit anderen Mentalitäten, schwierigen und traurigen Vergangenheiten und Geschichten.

Auch diesmal stellten sich einige der Freiwilligen ähnliche Fragen wie ich mir:

Ungewissheit was mich erwarten würde, erster Kontakt mit den Flüchtenden- wie soll ich mich verhalten? Was darf ich fragen über ihre Vergangenheit? Was denken sie über mich- wo ich doch aus einem reichen, sicheren Land komme?

Dazu kamen die Sprachbarriere und gewisse Vorurteile, teils aus den Medien, teils vom zuhause.

Jeder Volunteer hatte seine schlechten Momente, wo das Ausmass der Situation sowie die Hilflosigkeit nicht genug für die Menschen vor Ort tun zu können, zum Ausdruck kam.

Im Volunteer – Haus wurden jeweils beim Abendessen die Eindrücke und die Ereignisse besprochen. So konnte wenigstens ein Bruchtteil des Erlebten verarbeitet werden.

Doch die viel grössere Hilfe, um mit der Situation umzugehen, kam meiner Ansicht nach während der Arbeit im OneHappyFamily. Unsere “Helpers” wie wir sie nennen – Menschen die seit Monaten jeden Tag ins Center kommen um uns beim Aufbau und Betrieb tatkräftig mithelfen- unterstützten die Volunteers bei den zu erledigenden Arbeiten aber auch seelisch.

Kam ich beispielsweise mit der Situation von Ort nicht klar, wurde dies von einigen der Helpers sofort bemerkt. Trotz Probleme mit der Sprache wurde kein Versuch ausgelassen mich aufzuheitern. Diese Momente brachten  die bewunderswerte Stärke der Menschen aus den Camps zum Vorschein. Es war schön zu sehen, dass auch andere Volunteers solche Erfahrungen machen durften- was jeden bestärkte wieder mehr zurück zu geben.

Mich erstaunte immer wieder die grosse Neugier und Freude an neuen Freiwilligen seitens der “Helpers”, aber noch mehr wie herzlich und intensiv die Abschiede schon nach kurzen Begegnungen waren.

Ich kann wohl behaupten, dass jeder Volunteer mit vielen gemischten Gefühlen abgereist ist: traurig, weil es Zeit war sich von wunderbaren Menschen zuverabschieden und man sie auf der Insel zurücklies, glücklich weil man daran beteiligt war den Menschen während ihrem Besuch im OHF ein Lächeln ins Gesicht zu zaubern, bereichert durch die tollen Erinnerungen und Begegnungen mit starken und beeindruckenden Persönlichkeiten. Es ist toll zu wissen, dass die Arbeit im OHF spuren hinterlassen, Mauern abgebaut und die Sichtweise verändert hat- bei Volunteers aus der ganzen Welt wie auch bei den Helpers und Besuchern des Centers.

Nun wo auch ich wieder zuhause angekommen bin, kann ich sagen, dass man viel lernen kann von der offenen, hilfsbereiten Art der Flüchtenden sowie dem ungeheuren Durchhaltevermögen, Monate unter prekären Umständen zu meistern.

Der Einsatz vor Ort war trotz oder vielleicht wegen allen Höhen und Tiefen eine grosse Bereicherung.

Tamara

05 Jul

Shuttle, Bücher, Pflanzen, Shuttle

Der Tagesablauf ist einfach. Um 8 Uhr klingelt der Wecker, um 9 Uhr wird der Kaffee ins Community Center geliefert. „One happy family“ oder kurz OHF wird der Ort genannt, wo wir arbeiten, leben, uns die Nasen an der Sonne zu verbrennen. Weil wir das grösste Auto haben, haben wir die Ehre jeden morgen ca. um 10 zum Camp Moria zu fahren um die Arbeiter zum OHF zu bringen. Eine fröhliche Truppe von ca. 15 Männer von Nepal, Syrien, Algerien, Marokko, Afghanistan, Kongo stehen dann vor den Toren des Camps. Hinter ihnen zwei massive Zäune mit Stacheldraht und patrouillierende Millitärtypen mit dicken Sonnenbrillen. Rauchend, quasseln, manchmal ganz still begrüssen sie mich in diversen Sprachen und steigen in den Bus. 10 Minuten später schwärmen sie zum Tisch mit Toast und Käse und fahren dort weiter, wo sie am Tag zuvor aufgehört haben. Die Nepalesen bauen Tische, Bänke, Zäune, alles was aus Holz ist in grossen Massen. Das Kino ist schon fertig. Im Café mit kunstvoll verzierter Bar fehlen nur noch die Tische. Die Bibliothek ist fertig, nur noch ein paar Kisten arabische Bücher werden morgen eingeordnet. Die pinke Schule ist schon einiges weiter als zuvor, es fehlen Pflanzen, eine Wand zwischen den zwei Klassenzimmern und das Inventar. Ein Gärtner kam vor 2 Tagen mit einer riesen Ladung Pflanzen, die sich rund um das Gebäude ziehen werden. Ausserdem gibt es einen Indoor-garden der einem kleinen Urwald gleichen wird. Alles in Allem gibt es noch sehr vieles zu tun, die wichtigsten Teile sind aber fertig, sodass wir schon bald mit allen anstossen können.

Es ist eine wundervolle Arbeit und wenn die Arbeiter um 18 Uhr nur sehr zögerlich ins Auto zurück nach Moria einsteigen, wissen wir, dass wir etwas erreicht haben. Nämlich eine Atmosphäre der Menschlichkeit, Freude, Gemeinschaft, Frieden. „They treat us as humans here, not like animals like in the camp where we sleep“ Wir hören schlimme Geschichten, sehen verzweifelte Gesichter und versuchen so gut es geht zuzuhören und zu verstehen welche Zukunft diese Menschen erwartet. Obwohl wir bis jetzt noch keine unserer geplanten Aktivitäten durchgeführt haben sind wir sehr zufrieden, dass wir konstant etwas zutun haben und auch selber Initiative ergreifen können. Auch die Arbeiter verstehen langsam das Konzept. Zwei Künstler entwickelten Konzepte um die Wände und die Bibliothek zu bemalen, ein anderer verzierte die Mäuerchen im Garten mit viel Liebe und ein Dritter baute uns einfach mal schnell eine Treppe für die Bibliothek während sein Kollege, der Elektriker, Licht installierte. Manchmal wissen wir gar nicht mehr was helfen. Aber genau das ist das Ziel dieses Orts. OHF gehört den Leuten in den Camps, sie können ihn gestalten, sie werden ihn betreiben, sie werden sich gut fühlen auf ihre Art und wir werden nur assistieren, die Sicherheit gewährleisten und sie vielleicht ab und zu auf neue Ideen bringen.

Abends sind wir sehr müde, auch ein Grund wieso dieser Eintrag hier schon zu Ende ist. Aber Bilder sagen ja bekanntlich mehr als Worte.

Ursprünglich veröffentlich von FLO hilft am 29. März 2017